Character Types That Are In Most Stories

There are different types of characters in every story. All stories need a main character and, while short stories require another one or two characters, novels need to include many other different types.

Protagonist
The main character (or protagonist) is the person that readers should either identify with or understand and feel an emotional connection to the character. Writers want readers to cheer for their protagonists when they succeed and help them or feel sorry for them through the tough times.

Deuteragonist
Main characters will often have someone they can rely on and who is supportive. Depending on the storyline, this character can be categorised as a side-kick, second-in-command or best friend. This character has an important role to play and can offer comic relief or inner strength when the main character needs it the most. That doesn’t mean they can’t cause some conflict of their own.

In Merlin, the television series, Merlin was the main character and King Arthur was the deuteragonist. This was an interesting twist where in other stories King Arthur was the main character who relied on his wise, wizard friend Merlin.

There can also be multiple deuteragonists in a story, such as Harry Potter had Hermione Granger and Ron Weasley. Without those two, the story would be very different.

Antagonist
Where would we be without the malicious plotting of the villain (antagonist) in the story? Actually, the story would probably be a non-event. Antagonists have their own reasons for their desired outcome, which is in contrast to the main character’s wants and needs. The antagonist can be a person, a group (aliens invading the planet), or it can be an illness or disease.

Love Interest
This character is the main character’s love interest. It may be a bumpy road, a temporary relationship or a lasting relationship. The character could also be the deuteragonist, which could cause some conflict at times. This type of relationship is quite common, such as The X Files with FBI agents and partners Fox Mulder and Dana Scully, or Laura Holt and a thief who steps into the role of her mysterious boss in Remington Steele.

The person taking the role as the love interest may not be a prominent character and can be identified as a secondary character.

Secondary Characters
Some writers refer to this category as Tertiary Characters or they may even break this section into two groups: Secondary Characters and Tertiary Characters. But to keep things simple, it is included all under the one category.

These characters may help or hinder the main character or even the villain, which can be quite unintentional. There are usually multiple secondary characters in a story. This would include the suspects in a whodunit story, or people who show up every so often like the gardener who mows the lawn or the friendly shop assistant in a frequently visited shop. It includes all the characters that flit in and out of the main character’s life – some temporary and others for the long haul.

Ghost or Unseen Characters
There are often characters mentioned in a story that are never seen or heard, but these characters are mentioned and can often be the reason why the main character or other characters act in a certain way. These unseen characters may have died, been a childhood friend, or someone else that is referred to but never appears in the story.

Basically all your characters should fall into one of these categories. There are other groups, such as mentors, but they usually fall into one of the mentioned categories in this article.

 

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